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Train to Teach

Initial Teacher Training Accreditation (Market Review)

The government is committed to driving up and levelling up education standards so that children and young people in every part of the country acquire the knowledge, skills and qualifications they need to progress. Central to this is making sure that we have great teachers in every classroom, particularly those in the most disadvantaged areas.

To support this, the government published a new ITT core content framework, which sets out the fundamental knowledge, skills and teaching opportunities that all new entrants to the profession need.

Changes to ITT

Since September 2020, new teachers have been entitled to at least 3 years of evidence-based professional development and support.

They start with ITT, based on the core content framework, which is followed by a 2-year induction underpinned by the early career framework.

ITT market review aims

The review considered how the ITT sector can provide consistently high-quality training, in line with the core content framework, in a more efficient and effective market.

The aim of the review was to make well-informed, evidence-based recommendations on how to make sure:

  • all trainees receive high-quality training
  • the ITT market maintains the capacity to deliver enough trainees and is accessible to candidates
  • the ITT system benefits all schools

Accreditation

All providers wishing to offer ITT that leads to qualified teacher status from 2024 must undergo an accreditation process.

Applicants will be able to apply for accreditation in one of at least 2 application rounds taking place in 2022 which will finish well in advance of the 2023 to 2024 recruitment cycle.

Application round 1 opens on 1 December 2021 and the deadline for applications is 11:00, 7 February 2022.

Application round 2 is due to open on 19 April 2022 and the deadline for applications will be 11:00, 27 June 2022.

Providers who are not successful in round 1 will receive feedback from the DfE on their application and will be able to apply again in round 2 if they wish. Providers who are not successful in round 1 may also decide to work with a successfully accredited provider as a lead partner or school in partnership.

If an existing provider is unsuccessful in either round 1 or round 2 and chooses not to work with an accredited provider as a lead partner or school in partnership, then they will need to stop delivering ITT courses by August 2024.

For more information on how to become an accredited provider of ITT and the support available, see Initial teacher training (ITT): accreditation and support. A variety of useful documents can be found using the links below.       

The Department for Education appointed an expert group to undertake a review of the initial teacher training (ITT) market for courses that lead to qualified teacher status (QTS). The aim of the review is to enable the provision of consistently high quality training, in line with the ITT core content framework (CCF), in an effective and efficient market.

Following its publication, the department sought views on the recommendations made in the report through a public consultation.

The initial teacher training (ITT) core content framework defines in detail the minimum entitlement of all trainee teachers. Drawing on the best available evidence, it sets out the content that ITT providers and their partnerships must draw upon when designing and delivering their ITT programmes.

The ITT core content framework aligns with the Early Career Framework to establish an entitlement to a 3 or more year structured package of support for all new teachers at the start of their careers.

A key recommendation from Sir Andrew Carter’s review of initial teacher training (ITT) was for a set of non-statutory standards to be developed to help bring greater coherence and consistency to the school-based mentoring arrangements for trainee teachers. The Teaching Schools Council (TSC) were delighted to be asked by the Secretary of State to carry out this piece of work and developed a set of non-statutory standards, useful to a broad range of ITT mentors with a diverse range of experience and responsibility.

This report, by Sir Andrew Carter, sets out how the ITT system is performing and highlights examples of good practice as well as areas for improvement.

It makes 18 recommendations, some of which are aimed at the government and some for the teaching sector’s consideration.

See the independent reports commissioned in response to the review.

The government’s response to the review is also available.

NASBTT is a registered charity which represents the interests of schools-led teacher training provision in relation to the development and implementation of national policy developments. Members can access a wealth of information here. 

 

Guidance: The trainee teacher behavioural toolkit: a summary. Click here

Policy paper: Initial teacher training (ITT) market review: overview. Click here.

Guidance: Initial teacher training (ITT): accreditation. Click here.

Guidance: Initial teacher training (ITT): provider closure and withdrawal of ITT accreditation. Click here.

Guidance: Initial teacher training: self-evaluation and improvement planning for providers. Click here.

Guidance: Initial teacher education (ITE) inspection framework and handbook. Click here.